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Abstract

Educational policy frequently refers to change in some form and accountability measures are enacted to ensure the change is occurring. Yet, the most critical education decisions that alter the educational landscape are often made with static test score data and do not take into account the pattern of growth that may be occurring, even though growth modeling methodology is available and accessible. In this paper, two applications of multilevel growth modeling methodology to educational issues are illustrated. A call is made to replace the current practice of using static data for critical education decisions with growth modeling methods that allow the study of student and school growth patterns.

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