Abstract Title

Identifying Bacterial-Derived Compounds with Efficacy for Controlling Cyanobacteria

Start Date

24-5-2022 5:45 PM

End Date

24-5-2022 7:00 PM

Abstract

Cyanobacterial harmful algal blooms (cyanoHABs) can negatively impact freshwater systems by producing taste and odor compounds, reducing dissolved oxygen leading to anoxia, and releasing cyanotoxins. Thus, there is a need to develop and improve management techniques for controlling cyanoHABs. Both short- and long-term mitigation strategies are needed for management and exploiting bacterial-derived compounds for targeted chemical control is promising. In this study we screened commercially available, biologically derived compounds tyrptoline, tryptamine, isatin, sedoheptulose, and ginsenoside against Microcystis aeruginosa UTEX 2385 and M. aeruginosa BLCC-F188 in a cyanobacteria lawn plate and a liquid assay study. The compounds that inhibited Microcystis growth most effectively were then subjected to screening of higher trophic level species such as Ceriodaphnia dubia to see how these chemicals affect non-target species. Additionally, 70 bacteria were isolated from bloom events to evaluate cyanocidal activity, and two isolates (Pseudomonas sp. BLCC-B42 and Sphingomonas sp. BLCC-B43) showed at least a 30% reduction in algal biomass in co-culture experiments, while the supernatant of Sphingomonas sp. BLCC-B43 led to a 37% reduction of biomass after 72 hours. Future work will be focused on characterizing and isolating secondary compounds which are secreted by bacteria via genome mining for potential clusters and mass spectrometry.

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May 24th, 5:45 PM May 24th, 7:00 PM

Identifying Bacterial-Derived Compounds with Efficacy for Controlling Cyanobacteria

Cyanobacterial harmful algal blooms (cyanoHABs) can negatively impact freshwater systems by producing taste and odor compounds, reducing dissolved oxygen leading to anoxia, and releasing cyanotoxins. Thus, there is a need to develop and improve management techniques for controlling cyanoHABs. Both short- and long-term mitigation strategies are needed for management and exploiting bacterial-derived compounds for targeted chemical control is promising. In this study we screened commercially available, biologically derived compounds tyrptoline, tryptamine, isatin, sedoheptulose, and ginsenoside against Microcystis aeruginosa UTEX 2385 and M. aeruginosa BLCC-F188 in a cyanobacteria lawn plate and a liquid assay study. The compounds that inhibited Microcystis growth most effectively were then subjected to screening of higher trophic level species such as Ceriodaphnia dubia to see how these chemicals affect non-target species. Additionally, 70 bacteria were isolated from bloom events to evaluate cyanocidal activity, and two isolates (Pseudomonas sp. BLCC-B42 and Sphingomonas sp. BLCC-B43) showed at least a 30% reduction in algal biomass in co-culture experiments, while the supernatant of Sphingomonas sp. BLCC-B43 led to a 37% reduction of biomass after 72 hours. Future work will be focused on characterizing and isolating secondary compounds which are secreted by bacteria via genome mining for potential clusters and mass spectrometry.