Presentation Title

Black History: The Inclusion of Afro-Latinos through Cultural Responsive Teaching

Presenter Information

Mercedes Naber-Fisher

Location

BTSU 316

Start Date

22-2-2019 1:30 PM

End Date

22-2-2019 2:20 PM

Description

This presentation offers a critical, historical synthesis of the Black Arts Movement (1965-1975) and examines literature, visual culture, political formations, aesthetic foundations, music, spokespersons, and institutional development of BAM. The presentation explores BAM’s political and cultural roots, theoretical framework, and aesthetic mission as cultural assets and cultural tools for shaping Black critical consciousness, cultural production, media literacy, solidarity, and global awareness. The presentation also examines the role of BAM artist-activists in developing revolutionary institutions that functioned as independent, indigenous spaces for teaching, identity development, cultural affirmation, collective resistance, artistic cultivation, and employment. More, by understanding BAM as a ‘Maroonage’ site of literary nationalism, the presentation situates BAM within the Black Radical Tradition (C. Robinson, 1983) as a powerful force for social change, cultural preservation, principled truth telling, racial and social justice, ‘edutainment’, and liberation. Finally, the author interprets and situates BAM pedagogically as critical media literacy to encourage several things: 1) critical resistance to and escape from hegemonic ideology and psycho-cultural models imposed by the dominant culture; 2) development of Africanabased aesthetic and materialist approaches that make worthwhile use of Africana cultural knowledge; 3) development of an apprenticeship tradition to appropriately interpret, sustain, and convey BAM’s intellectual and literary genealogy to successive generations.

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Feb 22nd, 1:30 PM Feb 22nd, 2:20 PM

Black History: The Inclusion of Afro-Latinos through Cultural Responsive Teaching

BTSU 316

This presentation offers a critical, historical synthesis of the Black Arts Movement (1965-1975) and examines literature, visual culture, political formations, aesthetic foundations, music, spokespersons, and institutional development of BAM. The presentation explores BAM’s political and cultural roots, theoretical framework, and aesthetic mission as cultural assets and cultural tools for shaping Black critical consciousness, cultural production, media literacy, solidarity, and global awareness. The presentation also examines the role of BAM artist-activists in developing revolutionary institutions that functioned as independent, indigenous spaces for teaching, identity development, cultural affirmation, collective resistance, artistic cultivation, and employment. More, by understanding BAM as a ‘Maroonage’ site of literary nationalism, the presentation situates BAM within the Black Radical Tradition (C. Robinson, 1983) as a powerful force for social change, cultural preservation, principled truth telling, racial and social justice, ‘edutainment’, and liberation. Finally, the author interprets and situates BAM pedagogically as critical media literacy to encourage several things: 1) critical resistance to and escape from hegemonic ideology and psycho-cultural models imposed by the dominant culture; 2) development of Africanabased aesthetic and materialist approaches that make worthwhile use of Africana cultural knowledge; 3) development of an apprenticeship tradition to appropriately interpret, sustain, and convey BAM’s intellectual and literary genealogy to successive generations.