Panel 6: International Communication: Technology, Health, & Race

Presentation Title

Cultural Meanings of Health, Self-Care, and Help-Seeking Among Young Black Men: An Intersectional Approach

Degree Program

Graduate

Major

Nursing

Abstract

Background: Black men in the U.S. have greater burden, higher risk for mortality, and earlier onset of chronic health conditions than White men. Previous research has shown that in addition to these disparities, Black men are not full participants in the healthcare system. Approaches to understanding these troubling disparities in Black men's health and their failure to fully access the health care system, have focused on two distinct areas of research: masculinity & inequalities. However recently, scholars have called for an intersectional approach. Intersectionality allows for simultaneous consideration of the meaning and influence of multiple variables, identities, and characteristics, such as race, gender, ethnicity, health and illness behaviors, and environmental and economic determinants.

Method: Focused ethnography will be used to explore cultural meanings of health, self-care, and help-seeking among young Black men between the ages of 20-39. The Intersectional Approach to Men’s Health Disparities Framework (Griffith, 2012) will guide the study. Recruitment will occur via flyers and social outlets. Anticipated sample size for data saturation is 30 participants. To provide adequate representation of the target aggregate of men, ten participants per age group: (a) 20-26, (b) 27-33, and (c) 34-39 are desired for the study. Participants will be queried about their perceptions and understanding of health as well as the impact of race, gender, and other social determinants on their self-care and help seeking. Audio-taped interviews in the natural settings of the participants will be conducted. Interviews will be transcribed verbatim through the use a transcription service. A qualitative software program will be used to assist in data analysis.

Summary: This study will generate new knowledge that will be used to develop cultural theory to inform health care providers of more effective ways to engage Black men with the health care system and to diminish health disparities.

Start Date

8-2-2019 1:30 PM

End Date

8-2-2019 3:00 PM

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Feb 8th, 1:30 PM Feb 8th, 3:00 PM

Cultural Meanings of Health, Self-Care, and Help-Seeking Among Young Black Men: An Intersectional Approach

Background: Black men in the U.S. have greater burden, higher risk for mortality, and earlier onset of chronic health conditions than White men. Previous research has shown that in addition to these disparities, Black men are not full participants in the healthcare system. Approaches to understanding these troubling disparities in Black men's health and their failure to fully access the health care system, have focused on two distinct areas of research: masculinity & inequalities. However recently, scholars have called for an intersectional approach. Intersectionality allows for simultaneous consideration of the meaning and influence of multiple variables, identities, and characteristics, such as race, gender, ethnicity, health and illness behaviors, and environmental and economic determinants.

Method: Focused ethnography will be used to explore cultural meanings of health, self-care, and help-seeking among young Black men between the ages of 20-39. The Intersectional Approach to Men’s Health Disparities Framework (Griffith, 2012) will guide the study. Recruitment will occur via flyers and social outlets. Anticipated sample size for data saturation is 30 participants. To provide adequate representation of the target aggregate of men, ten participants per age group: (a) 20-26, (b) 27-33, and (c) 34-39 are desired for the study. Participants will be queried about their perceptions and understanding of health as well as the impact of race, gender, and other social determinants on their self-care and help seeking. Audio-taped interviews in the natural settings of the participants will be conducted. Interviews will be transcribed verbatim through the use a transcription service. A qualitative software program will be used to assist in data analysis.

Summary: This study will generate new knowledge that will be used to develop cultural theory to inform health care providers of more effective ways to engage Black men with the health care system and to diminish health disparities.