Communication Disorders Ph.D. Dissertations

Title

Aerodynamics of Vocal Vibrato

Date of Award

2017

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

Department

Communication Disorders

First Advisor

Ronald Scherer (Advisor)

Second Advisor

Alexander Goberman (Committee Member)

Third Advisor

Jason Whitfield (Committee Member)

Fourth Advisor

Mingsheng Li (Other)

Abstract

Airflow vibrato is the fluctuation in average airflow while singing with vibrato. Understanding airflow vibrato relates to a deeper understanding of its importance to physiological, pedagogical, and clinical aspects. Two studies were performed to examine airflow vibrato. The subjects for Study 1 were four professional Western classical singers, and for Study 2 four highly trained amateur singers. Aerodynamic and acoustic measures were compared among vibrato, bleating (a primarily adductory gesture), and external epigastric pumping (EEP, a primarily subglottal pressure manipulation). Utterances included speaking (phonation and whisper) and singing (constant /a/ vowel, different pitches and loudness levels).

Study 1 demonstrated how airflow vibrato compares with fundamental frequency (F0) and intensity vibrato. The correlation between rates of airflow and F0 vibrato was moderately strong. Mean airflow vibrato extents were larger for the female singers than for the male singers, and increased with pitch increase for all four singers. For the males, average airflow extent was 30 and 75 cm3/s for their lower and higher pitch, respectively, and for the females, 47 cm3/s and 94 cm3/s for their lower and higher pitch, respectively.

Study 2 was undertaken to better understand sources of airflow vibrato. Airflow modulations were produced during singing with vibrato and also while bleating and with external epigastric pumping. Bleating had the fastest alteration rate (9.5-12 Hz), whereas the other types had similar rates (vibrato: 4.8-6.0 Hz; EEP: 6.0–7.5 Hz). During phonation (combining all conditions), bleating had the largest airflow modulation extents (on average 144 cm3/s, compared to 30 cm3/s for vibrato and 46 cm3/s for EEP).

Overall results suggest that airflow vibrato typically leads F0 vibrato, and often has a more complex waveshape than F0 vibrato. Hypotheses generated from the study include: (1) A primarily subglottal pressure driven vibrato may provide relatively consistent but wide extents for both F0 and airflow vibrato. (2) A primarily glottal adduction driven vibrato may provide relatively low and inconsistent F0 vibrato extent, and high and inconsistent airflow extent. (3) A primarily CT driven vibrato may result in moderate to large F0 vibrato extent, and low airflow vibrato extent, with variable consistency.

Comments

Airflow vibrato is the fluctuation in average airflow while singing with vibrato. Understanding airflow vibrato relates to a deeper understanding of its importance to physiological, pedagogical, and clinical aspects. Two studies were performed to examine airflow vibrato. The subjects for Study 1 were four professional Western classical singers, and for Study 2 four highly trained amateur singers. Aerodynamic and acoustic measures were compared among vibrato, bleating (a primarily adductory gesture), and external epigastric pumping (EEP, a primarily subglottal pressure manipulation). Utterances included speaking (phonation and whisper) and singing (constant /a/ vowel, different pitches and loudness levels).

Study 1 demonstrated how airflow vibrato compares with fundamental frequency (F0) and intensity vibrato. The correlation between rates of airflow and F0 vibrato was moderately strong. Mean airflow vibrato extents were larger for the female singers than for the male singers, and increased with pitch increase for all four singers. For the males, average airflow extent was 30 and 75 cm3/s for their lower and higher pitch, respectively, and for the females, 47 cm3/s and 94 cm3/s for their lower and higher pitch, respectively.

Study 2 was undertaken to better understand sources of airflow vibrato. Airflow modulations were produced during singing with vibrato and also while bleating and with external epigastric pumping. Bleating had the fastest alteration rate (9.5-12 Hz), whereas the other types had similar rates (vibrato: 4.8-6.0 Hz; EEP: 6.0–7.5 Hz). During phonation (combining all conditions), bleating had the largest airflow modulation extents (on average 144 cm3/s, compared to 30 cm3/s for vibrato and 46 cm3/s for EEP).

Overall results suggest that airflow vibrato typically leads F0 vibrato, and often has a more complex waveshape than F0 vibrato. Hypotheses generated from the study include: (1) A primarily subglottal pressure driven vibrato may provide relatively consistent but wide extents for both F0 and airflow vibrato. (2) A primarily glottal adduction driven vibrato may provide relatively low and inconsistent F0 vibrato extent, and high and inconsistent airflow extent. (3) A primarily CT driven vibrato may result in moderate to large F0 vibrato extent, and low airflow vibrato extent, with variable consistency.

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