Title

LEARNING STYLES, SELF-EFFICACY, AND SATISFACTION WITH ONLINE LEARNING: IS ONLINE LEARNING FOR EVERYONE?

Date of Award

2007

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Education (Ed.D.)

Department

Leadership Studies

First Advisor

Rachel Vannatta

Abstract

This causal-comparative study examined learning style differences in and computer self-efficacy and satisfaction with online professional development. Thirty teachers enrolled in a Lesson Lab BreakThrough Mathematics online course completed three different instruments: Kolb’s Learning Style Inventory (Kolb, 1999); Computer Usage Self-Efficacy Scale (Cassidy & Eachus, 2002); and Web-Based Learning Instrument (Chang & Fisher, 2003). Kolb’s Learning Style inventory divulged the percentage of participants with the Assimilator learning style was much higher than the other three learning styles—Accommodator, Diverger, and Converger. Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) was used to examine group differences in computer self-efficacy and satisfaction with online professional development. T-test of related samples compared pre- and post-computer self-efficacy scores. The results indicated a significant increase from pre- to post- survey (p = .027). Pearson Correlation revealed no significant relationship between computer self-efficacy (pre or post) and satisfaction with online learning. The results of this study revealed participants in an online course do not differ significantly by learning style, with respect to computer self-efficacy and satisfaction with online learning. However, computer self-efficacy increased significantly from pre- to post- survey.