Abstract Title

Microcystin-LR, -LW, and -LF on microplastics: toxic compounds adsorbed by six plastics

Start Date

24-5-2022 5:45 PM

End Date

24-5-2022 7:00 PM

Abstract

Water quality is an increasing global environmental concern. An indicator of poor water quality is the presence of cyanobacterial blooms. The hepatotoxin microcystins (MC) are the most common group of cyanotoxins reported in freshwater. There are over 200 variants, often detected as a mixture in the environment. Other pollutants, e.g., microplastics, are also commonly detected in aquatic systems. There is an emerging concern that microplastics can act as a vector for micropollutants when they co-exist in the same environment, including microcystins.

This study evaluated a mixture of three microcystins (1 µg mL-1 each) with six microplastic types (polypropylene, polyethylene terephthalate, polystyrene, polyamide, polyethylene, and polyvinyl chloride) with average particle sizes of 5-45 µm. The effect of microcystin hydrophobicity on the adsorption by microplastics was evaluated. Polypropylene, polystyrene, polyvinyl chloride, and polyethylene adsorbed all variants, while polyethylene terephthalate only adsorbed MC-LW, and no adsorption was observed by polyamide. Polypropylene showed the greatest adsorption of the variants, adsorbing from 80% (MC-LR) to 100% (MC-LW/LF). The largest concentration adsorbed onto microplastics was observed for MC-LW, followed by -LF, and finally MC-LR.

Therefore, microplastics can act as a vector for microcystins in the aquatic environment, with possible implications when they enter the food chain.

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May 24th, 5:45 PM May 24th, 7:00 PM

Microcystin-LR, -LW, and -LF on microplastics: toxic compounds adsorbed by six plastics

Water quality is an increasing global environmental concern. An indicator of poor water quality is the presence of cyanobacterial blooms. The hepatotoxin microcystins (MC) are the most common group of cyanotoxins reported in freshwater. There are over 200 variants, often detected as a mixture in the environment. Other pollutants, e.g., microplastics, are also commonly detected in aquatic systems. There is an emerging concern that microplastics can act as a vector for micropollutants when they co-exist in the same environment, including microcystins.

This study evaluated a mixture of three microcystins (1 µg mL-1 each) with six microplastic types (polypropylene, polyethylene terephthalate, polystyrene, polyamide, polyethylene, and polyvinyl chloride) with average particle sizes of 5-45 µm. The effect of microcystin hydrophobicity on the adsorption by microplastics was evaluated. Polypropylene, polystyrene, polyvinyl chloride, and polyethylene adsorbed all variants, while polyethylene terephthalate only adsorbed MC-LW, and no adsorption was observed by polyamide. Polypropylene showed the greatest adsorption of the variants, adsorbing from 80% (MC-LR) to 100% (MC-LW/LF). The largest concentration adsorbed onto microplastics was observed for MC-LW, followed by -LF, and finally MC-LR.

Therefore, microplastics can act as a vector for microcystins in the aquatic environment, with possible implications when they enter the food chain.