Panel 4: Writers Addressing Race

Presentation Title

Colorism: The Effect of Interracial Racism

Presenter Information

Hannah McDermottFollow

Degree Program

Undergraduate

Major

English

Abstract

It is clear that issues involving race have plagued the growth of the United States since the early stages of the land's development. However, through Wallace Thurman's novel The Blacker the Berry, he is able to illustrate the struggles of racism within the African American society, having detrimental effects on the psychological aspect of racism as well. My paper focuses on the main character, Emma Lou, who faces both public and personal racism throughout her upbringing. Focusing on the problems that discrimination brings forward, the novel hones in on African Americans in education, family, the work place, and even romantic relationships. By dissecting Emma Lou’s character, I attempt to dive deeper into her insecurities about not only her race, but her gender as well, and how this reflects her ability to integrate herself into her society, which she herself even grapples with accepting.

Start Date

8-2-2019 10:30 AM

End Date

8-2-2019 11:45 AM

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Feb 8th, 10:30 AM Feb 8th, 11:45 AM

Colorism: The Effect of Interracial Racism

It is clear that issues involving race have plagued the growth of the United States since the early stages of the land's development. However, through Wallace Thurman's novel The Blacker the Berry, he is able to illustrate the struggles of racism within the African American society, having detrimental effects on the psychological aspect of racism as well. My paper focuses on the main character, Emma Lou, who faces both public and personal racism throughout her upbringing. Focusing on the problems that discrimination brings forward, the novel hones in on African Americans in education, family, the work place, and even romantic relationships. By dissecting Emma Lou’s character, I attempt to dive deeper into her insecurities about not only her race, but her gender as well, and how this reflects her ability to integrate herself into her society, which she herself even grapples with accepting.