Title

Job Insecurity, Organizational Citizenship Behaviors, and Job Search Activities: How Work Locus of Control and Control-Oriented Coping Moderate These Relationships

Date of Award

2013

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

Department

Psychology/Industrial-Organizational

First Advisor

Steve Jex (Committee Chair)

Second Advisor

Stefan Fritsch (Committee Member)

Third Advisor

William Balzer (Committee Member)

Fourth Advisor

Rob Carels (Committee Member)

Abstract

Past research has identified relationships between job insecurity and both organizational citizenship behaviors and job search activities. The current study expanded on that research by examining the moderating effects of two personality and coping variables--work locus of control and control-oriented coping--on the relationships between job insecurity and the two outcome variables: organizational citizenship behaviors and job search activities. Online survey data were collected from a sample of 309 permanent, non-unionized employees in the United States who worked over 30 hours a week. Hierarchical regression analysis identified a negative relationship between job insecurity and organizational citizenship behaviors, as well as a positive relationship between job insecurity and job search activities. Additionally, control-oriented coping interacted with job insecurity in explaining variance in both organizational citizenship behaviors and job search activities. Work locus of control did not interact with job insecurity in explaining incremental variance in organizational citizenship behaviors and job search activities. Practical implications of results and suggestions for research are discussed.