Location

BTSU 314

Start Date

24-4-2015 10:30 AM

End Date

24-4-2015 11:15 AM

Description

War Veterans and Civilian Reentry: Combatting Unemployment with Entrepreneurship

Stephen Frochen, Research Assistant and Doctoral Student, Scripps Gerontology Center

Objectives. The primary objective of this paper is to emphasize the unique professional problems that war and disabled veterans face when returning from military service to the civilian workforce. Secondary objectives include presenting employment outcomes of vulnerable war veterans groups and investigating entrepreneurship and other state and federal employment programs to uncover relevant work opportunities.

Methods. This paper describes military life and the distinct professional characteristics of veterans, particularly those with disabilities. Drawing upon the theoretical bases of group dynamics, military socialization, and cumulative inequality, it shapes the experiences of war veterans into a new and cohesive paradigm. Integrated Public Use Microdata Series (IPUMS) data are utilized to discover the unemployment situation among disabled Vietnam and Post 9/11 veterans and civilians. Finally, government employment programs are examined to catalogue work opportunities for combat veterans struggling to obtain work.

Findings. As service-connected disability increases in the veteran population, unemployment increases. Disabled Vietnam and Post-9/11 veterans are shown to experience higher levels of workforce participation than disabled civilians. Additionally, disabled Post-9/11 veterans suffer lower unemployment levels than their disabled civilian counterparts.

Conclusions. Although many services exist for war veterans to find employment after military service, veterans need more exposure to such programs to develop real interest. Furthermore, policymakers and private interests might consider bolstering veteran entrepreneurship services with business loan programs.

Included in

Gerontology Commons

Share

COinS
 
Apr 24th, 10:30 AM Apr 24th, 11:15 AM

War Veterans and Civilian Reentry: Combatting Unemployment with Entrepreneurship

BTSU 314

War Veterans and Civilian Reentry: Combatting Unemployment with Entrepreneurship

Stephen Frochen, Research Assistant and Doctoral Student, Scripps Gerontology Center

Objectives. The primary objective of this paper is to emphasize the unique professional problems that war and disabled veterans face when returning from military service to the civilian workforce. Secondary objectives include presenting employment outcomes of vulnerable war veterans groups and investigating entrepreneurship and other state and federal employment programs to uncover relevant work opportunities.

Methods. This paper describes military life and the distinct professional characteristics of veterans, particularly those with disabilities. Drawing upon the theoretical bases of group dynamics, military socialization, and cumulative inequality, it shapes the experiences of war veterans into a new and cohesive paradigm. Integrated Public Use Microdata Series (IPUMS) data are utilized to discover the unemployment situation among disabled Vietnam and Post 9/11 veterans and civilians. Finally, government employment programs are examined to catalogue work opportunities for combat veterans struggling to obtain work.

Findings. As service-connected disability increases in the veteran population, unemployment increases. Disabled Vietnam and Post-9/11 veterans are shown to experience higher levels of workforce participation than disabled civilians. Additionally, disabled Post-9/11 veterans suffer lower unemployment levels than their disabled civilian counterparts.

Conclusions. Although many services exist for war veterans to find employment after military service, veterans need more exposure to such programs to develop real interest. Furthermore, policymakers and private interests might consider bolstering veteran entrepreneurship services with business loan programs.