Title

Perception of Speech and Non-Speech Motor Performance by Individuals with Parkinson Disease and Their Communication Partners: Comparison of Perceptual Ratings, Quality of Life Ratings and Objective Measures

Date of Award

2013

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

Department

Communication Disorders

First Advisor

Alexander Goberman

Second Advisor

John Folkins (Committee Member)

Third Advisor

Miriam Krause (Committee Member)

Fourth Advisor

Angela Nelson (Committee Member)

Abstract

Speech and non-speech motor deficits have been frequently reported in individuals with Parkinson disease (PD). These deficits not only impact the performance of specific tasks but also may affect quality of life (QOL) of individuals with PD. Prior studies have indicated mixed findings regarding perception of speech and non-speech motor performance of individuals with PD. Some studies report accurate self-perception by individuals with PD and other researchers suggest either underestimation or overestimation of own performance by the individuals with PD. The present study examined perception of speech and non-speech motor performance of individuals with PD by examining relationships between perceptual ratings by individuals with PD, ratings by communication partners, and ratings by a trained rater and corresponding speech and non-speech motor measures. Comparison of perceptual speech ratings by the three rater groups indicated overestimation of speech loudness by individuals with PD and communication partners when compared to the trained rater. Overall results indicated that individuals with PD and communication partners had perceptual deficits regarding speech and non-speech motor performance of individuals with PD. In addition to rating the speech of individuals with PD, the three rater groups rated the speech of control speakers. Results provided evidence for general perception deficit in individuals with PD. Finally, comparison of QOL ratings by individuals with PD (self ratings) and communication partners (proxy ratings) indicated no statistically significant group differences for non-speech motor and speech-related QOL measures. During situations when self-reports are either unavailable or not feasible, the communication partners can be included as alternative sources for obtaining information related to QOL changes in individuals with PD. However, self and proxy ratings should be carefully analyzed to determine the effects of PD-related deficits in individuals with PD. Finally, the lack of correlation between the two QOL measures indicated the importance of the choice of QOL measures to determine impact of PD on speech and non-speech motor performance of individuals with PD.