Title

African-Centered Charter School Personnel's Development and Support of Students

Abstract

Higher education and K-12 education develop the foundation for economic advancement for individuals, society, and the world. Developing college access in high schools is important because ethnic and racial minority students enroll in postsecondary education at lower rates than White students. The purpose of this study is to examine how an African-centered charter high school personnel develop students’ college-going aspirations. This study also examines how the school mission, physical setting, governance, values, and strategies utilized by African-centered personnel transmit and support a college-preparatory ethos.

Ethnocentric schools “seek to create social change by teaching children from their ‘centeredness’ rather than their ‘marginality’” (Carpenter, 2006). Ethnocentric schools serve as an alternative for families that desire ethno-centered education that incorporates culture into schooling. Ethnocentric schools operate on the foundation that culturally relevant pedagogy leads to higher self-esteem and eventually higher academic achievement among youth of color (Antrop-González, 2006).

To understand how an African-centered charter high school personnel develop students’ college-going aspirations, it is important to examine the literature on college-going cultures, ethnocentric education, charter schools, and social and cultural capital. Education has been long called the “the great equalizer” due to its ability to support and develop an individual’s upward mobility (Hagedorn & Tierney, 2002). Education can open doors of opportunity for postsecondary education or post-high school employment.

This study will contribute to the scholarly community by addressing cultural dynamics within higher education and highlighting multicultural educational approaches. This study can provide further insight regarding how ethno-centered or culturally relevant pedagogy can enhance or support students’ college-going aspirations and academic achievement.

Start Date

15-3-2013 9:30 AM

End Date

15-3-2013 10:45 AM

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African-Centered Charter School Personnel's Development and Support of Students

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Higher education and K-12 education develop the foundation for economic advancement for individuals, society, and the world. Developing college access in high schools is important because ethnic and racial minority students enroll in postsecondary education at lower rates than White students. The purpose of this study is to examine how an African-centered charter high school personnel develop students’ college-going aspirations. This study also examines how the school mission, physical setting, governance, values, and strategies utilized by African-centered personnel transmit and support a college-preparatory ethos.

Ethnocentric schools “seek to create social change by teaching children from their ‘centeredness’ rather than their ‘marginality’” (Carpenter, 2006). Ethnocentric schools serve as an alternative for families that desire ethno-centered education that incorporates culture into schooling. Ethnocentric schools operate on the foundation that culturally relevant pedagogy leads to higher self-esteem and eventually higher academic achievement among youth of color (Antrop-González, 2006).

To understand how an African-centered charter high school personnel develop students’ college-going aspirations, it is important to examine the literature on college-going cultures, ethnocentric education, charter schools, and social and cultural capital. Education has been long called the “the great equalizer” due to its ability to support and develop an individual’s upward mobility (Hagedorn & Tierney, 2002). Education can open doors of opportunity for postsecondary education or post-high school employment.

This study will contribute to the scholarly community by addressing cultural dynamics within higher education and highlighting multicultural educational approaches. This study can provide further insight regarding how ethno-centered or culturally relevant pedagogy can enhance or support students’ college-going aspirations and academic achievement.